How do I redesign paneer

Taste of Travel

Indian curries with paneer (or panir) are my favorite. Indian cream cheese, which you can easily make yourself on your own stove, is ubiquitous in India. I got to know this cheese, which simply enriches every dish while traveling through India. Since I eat mostly meatless anyway, it didn't take long before I stumbled across paneer for the first time - in the form of a paneer tikka masala, that is, paneer marinated and grilled in a tandoor oven in a curry sauce. Heavenly!!

Since then I have often made this cheese at home, as the workload is very low and the cheese is ready in half an hour.

Homemade paneer - step by step recipe

In a large saucepan, bring the milk to a boil over medium to high heat. At the beginning, from the point at which the milk gets hotter, stir continuously with a silicone spatula (or similar) so that the milk does not burn.

As soon as the milk starts to boil, add the vinegar (or lemon juice) and stir briefly. The milk now separates into whey and flaky cheese mass. If it doesn't, add a little more vinegar and let it simmer briefly. As soon as the milk curdles, take the pan off the stove and cover it for 5 minutes.

Either scoop the curds into the sieve with a slotted spoon or pour the entire contents of the pot into the sieve. If the sieve / cloth is very fine-meshed, I recommend skimming with a slotted spoon, as otherwise the whey often takes a long time to drain.

Rinse the cheese briefly with cold water to reduce the vinegar taste. (When using lemon juice, I don't rinse the cheese with water, the lemony aroma goes well with the cheese.)

Once all of the cheese has been skimmed off, divide it halfway evenly in the cheesecloth with a spoon and tie the cloth just above the cheese (best simply wrapped around with a string; when using a rubber ring, which is often wrapped around, this "knot" is pressed into the Cheese and make a deep dent. Here's a close-up.)

Now put the cheese on a cutting board that is in a sink. Put another cutting board or plate on it and weigh it down - either with tin cans or, my favorite, with a pot filled with water. Place a spoon handle under one side of the lowest cutting board so that the board has a slight incline and the whey can drain off better. (This is what it looks like in reality.)

For this recipe I weighed 3 kg (pot including water) on the cheese and pressed the cheese with it for half an hour.

Ready-pressed cheese.

After pressing, the cheese weighs around 200 g and is 11 cm in diameter and 2.5 cm high.

Paneer after pressing: top.

Paneer after pressing: bottom.

The cheese is very firm and easy to cut and process.

Paneer is cut into cubes and used in many Indian dishes - mostly curries. I'll be posting a paneer curry on the blog shortly. Update: Here is the promised recipe for Paneer Tikka Masala.

But this Aloo Masala also goes perfectly with the addition of paneer or the potatoes can be replaced by the cheese. I also think paneer is excellent in this creamy red lentil dal (just cook it for the last few minutes). Usually this cheese is not part of Dals, but why not?

Paneer - Indian cream cheese

The paneer according to the following recipe only needs 30 minutes to drain and is nice and firm afterwards. It is usually cut into cubes and used in curries (just add towards the end of the cooking time and cook briefly).

ingredients

  • 1 ½ liters of whole milk
  • 45 ml (approx. 4 ½ tbsp) white wine vinegar or lemon juice (with lemon juice, the amount may vary slightly up or down depending on the acidity)

preparation

  1. Line a sieve (preferably with a large mesh) with cheesecloth and place it in the sink.
  2. In a large saucepan, bring the milk to a boil over medium to high heat. At the beginning, from the point at which the milk gets hotter, stir continuously with a silicone spatula (or similar) so that the milk does not burn.
  3. As soon as the milk starts to boil, add the vinegar (or lemon juice) and stir briefly. The milk now separates into whey and flaky cheese mass. If it doesn't, add a little more vinegar and let it simmer briefly. As soon as the milk curdles, take the pan off the stove and cover it for 5 minutes.
  4. Either scoop the curd into the sieve with a slotted spoon or pour the entire contents of the pot into the sieve. If the sieve / cloth is very fine-meshed, I recommend skimming with a slotted spoon, as otherwise the whey often takes a long time to drain.
  5. Rinse the cheese briefly with cold water to reduce the vinegar taste. (When using lemon juice, I don't rinse the cheese with water, the lemony aroma goes well with the cheese.)
  6. Once all of the cheese has been skimmed off, divide it halfway evenly in the cheesecloth with a spoon and tie the cloth just above the cheese (best simply wrapped around with a string; when using a rubber ring, which is often wrapped around, this "knot" is pressed into the Cheese and makes a deep dent).
  7. Now put the cheese on a cutting board that is in a sink. Put another cutting board or plate on top and weigh it down - either with tin cans or, my favorite, with a pot filled with water. Place a spoon handle under one side of the lowest cutting board so that the board has a slight incline and the whey can drain off better. For this recipe I weighed 3 kg (pot including water) on the cheese and pressed the cheese with it for half an hour.
  8. After half an hour the paneer is pressed and firm and can be used as desired.

tip

It is best to process the cheese fresh. Paneer can be kept for a few days in a food storage container in the refrigerator. The cheese can also be stored in a container filled with water in the refrigerator for up to a week (change the water daily), but its consistency becomes softer.

https://www.tasteoftravel.at/paneer-indischer-frischkaese/
Did you cook this dish? Your result could be shown here. Just send a picture to [email protected]Reader Karin writes: "Finally time to cook again. Now I can try mmhhhhh ... Thank you and best regards, Karin from Fulenbach."