Is evolution still applicable to humans?

Evolution - nature, man, society

Extract

Chapter 4

Social behavior in the light of evolution and behavioral biology

Isabella B. R. Scheiber

4.1 Charles Darwin: Life and Work

"No other scientist of the 19th century has influenced our modern worldview - both in biology and beyond - more than this English researcher." (T. Junker 2001, p. 389)

The British natural scientist Charles Robert Darwin (February 12, 1809, Shrewsbury - April 19, 1882, Downe) is still one of the most famous natural scientists today, as he is widely regarded as the founder of the theory of evolution. The journey with the HMS Beagle, which began at the end of 1831 and lasted almost five years, and which took the young Darwin around the world, was both a key experience and the basis for his later work. Darwin first became known to the general public through his travelogue published in 1839. With his theory about the formation of coral reefs and other geological writings, he gained recognition as a geologist in scientific circles. In the mid-1850s, his research on barnacles also gave him a respected reputation as a zoologist and taxonomist.

As early as 1838, Darwin drafted his theory of adaptation to the habitat through variation and natural selection, thus explaining the evolutionary development of all organisms and their division into different species. For over 20 years he gathered evidence for this theory. In 1842 and 1844 Darwin wrote brief outlines of his theory, but he did not publish them. From 1856 he worked on an extensive manuscript with ...

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  • Cover
  • title
  • copyright
  • Author information
  • About the book
  • Citability of the eBook
  • Table of Contents
  • 1. Evolution - nature, man, society: introduction and overview
  • 2. Cosmic evolution, teleology and the multiverse
  • 3. Darwin's optimization in the mirror of physics and chemistry
  • 4. Social behavior in the light of evolution and behavioral biology
  • 5. The theory of evolution and the human mind
  • 6. The contribution of cognitive biology to the question of the origin of knowledge
  • 7. Karl Popper and evolutionary epistemology
  • 8. Darwin, Popper and Evolutionary Biology
  • 9. The meaning of life: what does evolutionary biology say?
  • 10. Looking for an evolutionary advantage: trading relationships with a few, some, or many
  • 11. The evolutionary economic approach of Neo-Schumpeterianism: A concept for explaining and coping with the global economic crisis
  • 12. All life is knowledge and will - Karl Popper's evolutionary biology
  • Author directory
  • Row overview
  • Cover
  • title
  • copyright
  • Author information
  • About the book
  • Citability of the eBook
  • Table of Contents
  • 1. Evolution - nature, man, society: introduction and overview
  • 2. Cosmic evolution, teleology and the multiverse
  • 3. Darwin's optimization in the mirror of physics and chemistry
  • 4. Social behavior in the light of evolution and behavioral biology
  • 5. The theory of evolution and the human mind
  • 6. The contribution of cognitive biology to the question of the origin of knowledge
  • 7. Karl Popper and evolutionary epistemology
  • 8. Darwin, Popper and Evolutionary Biology
  • 9. The meaning of life: what does evolutionary biology say?
  • 10. Looking for an evolutionary advantage: trading relationships with a few, some, or many
  • 11. The evolutionary economic approach of Neo-Schumpeterianism: A concept for explaining and coping with the global economic crisis
  • 12. All life is knowledge and will - Karl Poppers evolutionary biology
  • Author directory
  • Row overview